Japan is Making Its Golf Course Empty Nurseries Of Solar Energy

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Japan is Making Its Golf Course Empty Nurseries Of Solar Energy - tinoshare.com
Japan is Making Its Golf Course Empty Nurseries Of Solar Energy - tinoshare.com

Japan, the country that you never run out of ideas, has once again exceeded all possible levels of genius. The country has a respectable number of an empty golf course: they were built decades ago when the sport in question was popular among Japanese, but today are directed toward its inexorable decline. What to do with them? Quite simply, they have said from a private company in the country: convert solar energy fields. Fill them plates.

The idea comes from the company Kyocera, a gigantic enterprise engaged in electronics and technology. Given the awesome future of solar energy (we shall see why), from Kyocera have seen fit to use the excellent field of golf unused to install solar panels that generate electricity. The project is still at an early stage and is expected to be definitively completed in September 2017.

A big problems, big solutions

By then, Japan will have killed two birds with one stone. On the one hand, you have taken a large batch utility of idle land, no small matter in a country of so much population density. On the other, it will have begun to meet the significant energy role that nuclear energy was in the country until 2011. Fukushima accident in Japan decided to end its nuclear plants, but that has involved a series of energy drawbacks of difficult exit.

Japan is Making Its Golf Course Empty Nurseries Of Solar Energy

Installing a solar power complex will supply 23 megawatts of electricity to over 8,000 homes in the prefecture of Kyoto, and serve as a spur to a sector, solar energy, with multiple possibilities. So much so that the next plan of Kyocera already known: install another complex of solar panels in Kagoshima, this time of 92 megawatts and with intent to supply electricity to a conglomerate of more than 30,000 homes.

The energy problem in Japan is large, and the number of golf courses also empty. What to do in a country with great conditions for the growth of solar energy?The answer is obvious

The energy problem in Japan is large, and the number of golf courses also empty. What to do in a country with great conditions for the growth of solar energy? The answer is obvious, to the point that Kyocera is watching competitors are already so narrow niche. Pacific Project, another Japanese company operating in the country since 2012, has similar or construction or plans for the future. Golf and sun, what better alliance for the future electricity.

However, it has a problem: solar energy takes up too much ground. In countries like Spain that may not be a problem, but in other regions of the planet densely populated, as is the case in Japan. Solution? Also on hand Kyocera: install solar panels on water. It is what made the company in Osaka, creating a small resort that caters to almost 1,000 homes in the city. It also has advantages: the plates are much more efficient.

The idea has been so exciting being replicated in other parts of the world. In the United States, where solar energy has entered fully into the presidential race of 2016 at the hands of Hillary Clinton, there are similar plans for such problems: empty fields golf , a growing concern about the consequences of climate change and progressive growth of the possibilities of solar energy as a new source of energy in the country.

Pakistan, India, Europe?

The peculiarities of Japan make the Japanese country a special case, but hardly isolated. As we said, the United States began to debate openly on the energy future of the country, and makes looking boldly toward solar energy. Clinton , yesterday, explaining his energy and climate agenda , and made an emphasis on installing more than 500 million solar plates across the country in his first term.

Hillary Clinton hopes that the United States believes enough renewable energy to supply all households in the country for 2026: They are big words

It went further: between 2016 and 2026 that the United States hopes to be able to produce enough renewable energy to supply all households in the country. They are strong words, driven, as usual, with a great story about the future of the planet we will leave to our children and grandchildren. But no matter: last year alone, solar energy created more than 50,000 jobs and an industry 35.000 billion.

Meanwhile, other countries are taking note. Japanese banks and companies are beginning to invest elsewhere in Asia. The center of attention is directed towards India , a country with excellent conditions to develop solar energy: it has a large area, with large populations which provide the most efficient manner possible and with enough daylight hours to the project to fruition. Softbank have already entered the race .

Today India is one of the most polluting countries in the world, mainly because of its huge coal industry.Solar energy is a must choice

Since the Indian government was fully aware of the need to change the energy model of the country. Today India is one of the most polluting countries in the world , mainly because of its huge coal industry. The country has enough to spend on solar energy (and if you can not always choose the option Japanese golf courses or small ponds) land, and market returns would be high .

Solar energy is also a solution for some developing countries. In the case of Pakistan . Almost half the country is not connected to the national power system.But need electricity at cheap prices. Solution? Energy self-sufficiency through solar panels , used by the residents themselves. The idea is being conducted by the foundation Lighting a Million Lives , and aims to supply 4,000 homes by 2017.

Japan is Making Its Golf Course Empty Nurseries Of Solar Energy

Solar panels in the US. (Image: Steve Rainwater)

Meanwhile, what is happening in our continent, in Europe? Germany, Italy, Britain, France, Spain and Belgium are among the top ten producers of solar power around the globe . Stresses Germany, the leader, but also Italy, the bet is decided from the beginning of the century. In Spain are unbeatable conditions (long hours of sunlight per year throughout the country, much free land), but not so now.

In Spain, renewable energy and produce 30% of electricity in the country, belonging to nearly 8% of solar energy. Six of the ten countries that rely on solar energy are European, including Spain

Renewable energy and produce 30% of electricity in the country, belonging to nearly 8% of solar energy. However, the project of the current government to regulate consumption has been seen both in green sectors and most of the opposition as a way to hamper the growth of solar energy. Something similar happens in Britain, where the Conservative government is considering ending subsidies for small solar plants.

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